NAVIGATE CHALLENGING CASES

with i‑STAT tbi plasma, an objective biomarker test for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)

lptbiherotab
lptbiherotab

 



 

NAVIGATE CHALLENGING CASES

with i‑STAT tbi plasma, an objective biomarker test for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)

lptbiheromobile
lptbiheromobile
lptbiheromobile

 

 

NAVIGATE CHALLENGING CASES

with i‑STAT tbi plasma, an objective biomarker test for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)

lptbihero
lptbihero
lptbihero

subjective methods for evaluating suspected mTBI can leave you in a quandary

Millions of patients undergo emergency department (ED) evaluation for mTBI each year. Neurocognitive assessments, such as the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and clinical decision rules (CDRs), are subjective and can be difficult to perform with certain patients, such as those who are intoxicated or have an altered mental health status.¹

90 percent 90 percent 90 percent

As a result, you may decide to order a CT, despite having low clinical suspicion of intracranial bleeding. In fact, while an estimated 82% of patients with TBI undergo CT, more than 90% show no evidence of traumatic abnormality.² What’s more, some patients may insist on a CT even though you deem it unwarranted.

The i-STAT TBI Plasma test may be the solution to provide objective data without time-consuming and often avoidable head CTs for mTBI.